Aug 272016
 
sunray-quilt-square_150726

I admit it – I’m a scrapaholic – I have a hard time tossing out even the smallest fabric scraps just in case

In an effort to make use of some of my quilting scraps, I started making these little mouse-sized quilts, just for fun and as a sort of “palette cleanser” (thank you Athena, perfect turn of pharse) to clear my quilting cobwebs. After making way too many quiltlets, the time seemed ripe to post a tutorial – I hope you find it fun and useful.

Note: This tutorial assumes basic sewing knowledge, but quilting knowledge is optional because it’s so darn simple.

Choose a pile of scraps (I chose shades of blue).

Choose a pile of scraps (I chose shades of blue).

Layer batting and interfacing (interfacing can be replaced with muslin or anything plain).

Layer batting and interfacing (interfacing can be replaced with muslin or anything plain and not stretchy, but not too heavy).

Cut to 10x10 inches.

Cut layered pieces to 10×10 inches.

Stitch the two layers together - an "x" or plus works well.

Stitch the two layers together – an “x” or plus works well.

Corner to corner measurement is about 14 inches, so...

Corner to corner measurement is about 14 inches, so…

Cut the first strip about 3 inches wide by 14 inches long and sew it to the batting side along both long edges.

Cut the first strip about 3 inches wide by 14 inches long and sew it to the batting side along both long edges.

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Cut 6 more 3-inch wide strips, but they don't need to be the full 14-inch length. They will fan out to the corners, as shown here, and can be gradually a bit shorter (all will be trimmed later).

Cut 6 more 3-inch wide strips, but they don’t need to be the full 14-inch length. They will fan out to the corners, as shown here, and can gradually be a bit shorter (to be trimmed later).

For the next strip, lay it at an angle to the first, not parallel.

For the next strip, lay it at an angle to the first, not parallel.

Flip it over so right sides are together, and stitch.

Flip it over so right sides are together, and stitch.

Flip it back and finger press into place. You can pin it down as well, if you like.

Flip it back and finger press into place. You can pin it down as well, if you like.

Next strip, same procedure, then just build out from there...

Next strip, same procedure, then just build out from there…

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Final 2 strips...

Final 2 strips pinned in place…

Press it all down... Looks a little funny at this stage, but you can see the sun rays...

Press it all down… Looks a little funny at this stage, but you can see the sun rays…

Flip it over...

Flip it over…

And baste-stitch around the square, close to the edge.

And baste-stitch around the square, close to the edge.

Trim off the excess from the back. I suggest using a rotary cutter and a good straight-edge. Easy does it, don't slip...

Trim off the excess from the back. I suggest using a rotary cutter and a good straight-edge. Easy does it, don’t slip…

Flip it back over - almost done.

Flip it back over – almost done.

Using a dessert bowl as a template, cut a circle of fabric. This came out sorta earthy!

Using a dessert bowl as a template, cut a circle of fabric. This came out sorta earthy!

Pin it to the corner where the strips converge. Vary the placement as you like.

Pin it to the corner where the strips converge. Vary the placement as you like.

Set your machine to a tight zigzag stitch...

Set your machine to a tight zigzag stitch…

And stitch along the circumference...

And stitch along the circumference…

to encase the raw edge.

to encase the raw edge of the circle.

Baste down the corner (from behind, easier to follow the line of the square)...

Baste down the corner (from behind, easier to follow the line of the square)…

and trim off the excess.

and trim off the excess.

The last step is to bind the edge of your quiltlet. Have a look at this tutorial – it’s awesome. No point in reinventing the wheel – just follow these binding instructions and you are golden (except that I don’t recommend using “steam a seam” – just sew it… you’ll see).

Here it is, all bound and pretty.

Here it is, all bound and pretty.

With its friends.

With its friends.

Another option is to skip the batting layer, skip the binding, and simply make a pile of quilt squares to eventually assemble into a big, colorful quilt. Hmm… that may well be my next project.

So there it is! I hope you found this tutorial useful and simple to follow. I’d love your comments and critiques.

— LindaEve in NJ

 Posted by on 2016/08/27 sewing No Responses »
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